Category Archives: Sterilization

Do You Brush Your Night Guard Before Bed? | Oak Lawn Dentist

We all strive to get a good night’s sleep. And when we have an issue with grinding our teeth as we sleep, we are not only preventing a good night’s sleep, but also can cause harm to your teeth. This is where a night guard comes in. And although night guards are there to help, night guards need proper care and attention to make sure that you don’t just end up trading one dental problem for another. After all, bacteria can find a hiding place in our mouths very easily, and bacteria is what is causing all of our dental issues. Here are some essential night guard care tips that should come in handy:

Brush your night guard. Whenever you take out your night guard in the morning, brush it as you would your teeth. Use a different, soft toothbrush and clean with a liquid antibacterial soap.

Cleanliness is next to godliness. Same as the night guard itself, you should always clean its storage case. Use liquid antibacterial soap with some hot water this time around, as it won’t ruin the case.

Take care of your teeth. Before you even think about putting your night guard in your mouth, make sure that you have practiced proper dental hygiene first.

Have your night guard checked. Be sure that you have your night guard at your dental appointments, so the dentist can clean it and examine it for wear and tear. Although very durable, these oral appliances are not invincible and will need to be replaced from time to time.

If you would like to find out more about night guards, contact Dr. Bartz in Oak Lawn, IL at 708-430-4440 to schedule a consultation. Or visit www.bartzandbartzdental.com for additional information.

Dr. Bartz proudly serves Oak Lawn and all surrounding areas.

Take Care of Your Mouthguard | Oak Lawn Dentist

Believe it or not, bruxism, or nighttime teeth grinding is a common habit that will eventually wreak havoc on your teeth and gums. If this is the case, it is likely that a mouthguard will be recommended. These custom-made oral appliances can help teeth from getting damaged or chipped while you sleep. And like all things that you use on a daily, maintenance is required. Here are some essential night guard care tips:

Keep it clean. Whenever you take out your night guard in the morning, brush it as you would your teeth. Preferably, use a different, soft toothbrush and a liquid antibacterial soap. Also, use warm water and be sure to dry it thoroughly before storing it in its respective case. Using hot water is not advisable because it can ruin the appliance.

Don’t forget the case. Use liquid antibacterial soap and feel free to use hot water – it won’t ruin the case. Store it in a place far from dust and other contaminants.

Take care of your teeth. Before you even think about putting your night guard in your mouth, make sure that you have brushed and flossed beforehand. Otherwise, bacteria will transfer from your mouth to your night guard and allow them to grow through the night.

Bring It to Exams. Every time you visit your dentist, have your night guard with you so it can be examined for wear and tear, as well as give it a good cleaning. If you notice any damage, go to your dentist immediately and ask for proper advice.

If you would like to find out more about mouthguard maintenance, contact Dr. Bartz in Oak Lawn, IL at 708-430-4440 to schedule a consultation. Or visit www.bartzandbartzdental.com for additional information.

Dr. Bartz proudly serves Oak Lawn, Chicago, Orland Park, Burbank, Palos Hills and all surrounding areas.

Did You Wash Your Hands? A Guide to Dental Sterilization | Oak Lawn Dentist

When you’re waiting for the dentist to begin your check-up, have you ever looked around at all of the equipment lying around? It’s kind of crazy how much stuff has the potential to enter your mouth at some point in the visit. But it isn’t crazy to wonder how each tool is sterilized.

The American Dental Association sets guidelines for dental tool sterilization. Various tools are broken down into three distinct categories, each of which is treated differently based on risk.

Critical tools. These are tools that may penetrate tissue or bone, such as scalpels, forceps, and scalers. Because they’re penetrating into sterile tissue, it’s absolutely crucial that these tools be sterilized regularly – after each and every use. The ADA requires that these tools be sterilized using steam under pressure, dry heat, or chemical heat in an autoclave.

Semi-critical tools. Those tools that come in contact with mucous membranes or non-intact skin, like mirrors and dental trays for impressions, should also be sterilized after every use. However, in some cases where sterilization isn’t practical, it’s permissible for these tools to be disinfected with an EPA certified high-level disinfectant.

Non-critical tools. Tools that only come in contact with skin, such as x-ray components and blood pressure cuffs, have a relatively low risk of transmitting infection. However, they are still cleaned between patients with a medium-level or low-level disinfectant, suitable for hospital use.

If you have any concerns, do not be afraid to ask Dr. Bartz about the tools and cleaning process next time you’re in the office.

If you would like to find out more about instrument sterilization practices, contact Dr. Bartz in Oak Lawn, IL at 708-430-4440 to schedule a consultation. Or visit www.bartzandbartzdental.com for additional information.

Dr. Bartz proudly serves Oak Lawn, Chicago, Orland Park, Burbank, Palos Hills and all surrounding areas.

 

How Dental Professionals Clean Their Instruments | Oak Lawn Dentist

skd284147sdcWhen you’re sitting in the dentist office waiting for your appointment, you notice all of the tools that may or may not end up in your mouth. Ever wonder how they sterilize them? The American Dental Association, working with the Centers for Disease Control, sets guidelines for dental tool sterilization. Each tool is listed in one of three categories and treated based on risk.

Critical tools. These are tools that may penetrate tissue or bone, such as scalpels, forceps, and scalers. Because they are used on sterile tissue, it’s crucial that these tools be sterilized after each and every use. The ADA requires that these tools be sterilized using steam under pressure, dry heat, or chemical heat. An autoclave is a pressure chamber used to carry out industrial processes requiring elevated temperature and pressure different to ambient air pressure. Autoclaves are used in medical applications to perform sterilization.

Semi-critical tools. Any tool that comes in contact with mucous membranes or non-intact skin, mirrors and dental trays for impressions should also be sterilized after every use. However, it’s permissible for these tools to be disinfected with an EPA certified high-level disinfectant.

Non-critical tools. X-ray components and blood pressure cuffs that only come in contact with skin have a relatively low risk of transmitting infection. However, they are still cleaned between patients with a medium-level or low-level disinfectant.

If you would like to find out more about sterilization practices, contact Dr. Bartz in Oak Lawn, IL at 708-430-4440 to schedule a consultation. Or visit www.bartzandbartzdental.com for additional information.

Dr. Bartz proudly serves Oak Lawn, Chicago, Orland Park, Burbank, Palos Hills and all surrounding areas.

 

How are Dental Tools Sterilized? | Oak Lawn, Il Dentist

Close-up of dental toolsWhen you’re sitting in the chair, waiting for the your dentist, you may notice all those dental tools laid out on the table. It’s reasonable for a patient who sees tools that will be going into their mouth to wonder how each tool is sterilized. So, you’re not alone!

The American Dental Association, working with the Centers for Disease Control, sets guidelines for dental tool sterilization. Various tools are broken down into three distinct categories, each of which is treated differently based on risk.

The first category is critical tools – these are tools that may penetrate tissue or bone, such as scalpels, forceps, and scalers. Because they’re penetrating into sterile tissue, it’s absolutely crucial that these tools be sterilized regularly – after each and every use. The ADA requires that these tools be sterilized using steam under pressure, dry heat, or chemical heat. Also called autoclaving: An autoclave is a pressure chamber used to carry out industrial processes requiring elevated temperature and pressure different to ambient air pressure. Autoclaves are used in medical applications to perform sterilization.

For semi-critical tools that still come in contact with mucous membranes or non-intact skin – such as mirrors and dental trays for impressions – the ADA recommends that these, too, should be sterilized after every use. However, in some cases where sterilization isn’t practical, it’s permissible for these tools to be disinfected with an EPA certified high-level disinfectant.

Finally, non-critical tools that only come in contact skin, such as x-ray components and blood pressure cuffs, have a relatively low risk of transmitting infection. However, they are still cleaned between patients with a medium-level or low-level disinfectant, suitable for hospital use.

Dr. Bartz is very aware of the risk that non-sterilized instruments pose to your oral health, and work diligently to keep a safe and sterile workspace, which includes safe and sterile tools. Proper safety procedures greatly reduce patient risk, and your dentist happily complies with the most recent ADA guidelines for managing tools in a safe manner.

You can also find dozens of ‘how it’s done’ videos on YouTube. Try searching for autoclave or dental instrument sterilization.

If you have any concerns, do not be afraid to ask Dr. Bartz about the tools & process next time you’re in the office. However, have not fear! The instruments they will be using on you have been throughly cleaned and disinfected!

For more information on oral health, contact Dr. Bartz at (708) 430-4440 or visit our website at  bartzandbartzdental.com.

Dr. Bartz also welcomes patients from Chicago, Orland Park, Burbank and Palos Hills.